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Project Information

Title: LTM Program - Long-term monitoring of oceanographic conditions in Cook Inlet/Kachemak Bay to understand recovery and restoration of injured near-shore species. Project Period: October 1,

Project Year and Number: 2012: 12120114-G

Other Fiscal Years and Numbers for this Project: 2017: 17120114-J, 2013: 13120114-G

Principal Investigator (PI): Angela Doroff

Assisting Personnel: Kris Holderied

Research Location: Lower Cook Inlet

Restoration Category: Research

Injured Resources Addressed: Not Specified

Abstract: This project is a component of the integrated Long-term Monitoring of Marine Conditions and Injured Resources and Services submitted by McCammon et. al. The Kachemak Bay Research Reserve (KBRR) and NOAA Kasitsna Bay Laboratory jointly propose to continue and enhance oceanographic monitoring in Kachemak Bay and lower Cook Inlet, in order to provide the physical data needed for a comprehensive restoration monitoring program in the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) affected area. This project will leverage and enhance KBRR water quality monitoring stations, establish routine small boat oceanographic and plankton surveys to assess spatial, seasonal and inter-annual variability in water mass movement, leverage information from previous oceanographic surveys, provide environmental information to aid separately proposed benthic monitoring projects, and benefit from a new NOAA ocean circulation model for Cook Inlet. Longterm monitoring of physical changes and connectivity in the marine environment is essential to understand what drives both gradual and sudden changes in coastal ecosystems and estuarine systems in the affected area, including Prince William Sound and Cook Inlet. In addition to longterm effects from the EVOS, these coastal waters and habitats are impacted by the other physical stressors including climate change, ocean acidification, and continuing land-level and sedimentation changes from the 1964 earthquake and isostatic rebound from melting glaciers. The Cook Inlet/Kachemak Bay oceanographic information from this project will allow determination of patterns and trends in ocean circulation and plankton and aid in interpretation of biological monitoring data on the status and trends of injured resources in the near-shore environment. In conjunction with separately proposed oceanographic monitoring projects in PWS and the Gulf of Alaska, the project will enable assessment of whether circulation patterns in the Gulf of Alaska are synchronous with near-shore trends, which has implications for biological abundance and diversity. Our objective is to implement an enhanced, long-term Cook Inlet near-shore oceanographic monitoring program that directly informs management for sustained recovery and restoration of EVOS-injured resources in the face of environmental variability, shifts and long-term changes.


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Proposal: View PDF (361 KB)

Funding Recommendations: View

Funding Detail For: 2012 , 2013 , 2014 , 2015 , 2016

Quarterly Project Tasks For: 2012 , 2013 , 2014 , 2015 , 2016

Annual Reports: 2012: View (2,264 KB) 2013: View (9,582 KB) 2014: View (969 KB) 2015: View (1,019 KB) 2016: Due 09/01/2016

Final Report: Final Report Not Available - For Current Status Please Contact Us

Publications from this Project: None Available

More information may be available for this project under other years:

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Project Number Proposal Annual Reports Final Report Data
2017: 17120114-J View (PDF) 2017: View (PDF)
Final Report Not Available - For Current Status Please Contact Us No datasets
2013: 13120114-G Not Available 2013: Due 09/01/2013
Final Report Not Available - For Current Status Please Contact Us No datasets